Product Sustainability

 

Carbon Footprints

Product Carbon Footprint of silicones, siloxanes and silane products

In this study the product carbon footprint (PCF) of silicones, siloxanes and silane products related to their entire life-cycle is calculated. This is done under consideration of the whole market of products consumed in Europe, North America, and Japan. The PCF then is compared with greenhouse gas (GHG) abatement benefits resulting from the use of silicone & silane products due to reduced consumption of fossil fuels and saved production of other materials.   Results show that using silicones, siloxanes and silane products generates greenhouse-gas emission reductions that outweigh the impacts of production and end-of-life disposal by a factor of 9. Emission reductions are equivalent to about 54 million tons of CO2, which corresponds to the amount required to heat 10 million homes in the area covered by the study. Nutshell: http://www.siliconescarbonbalance.com/pdf/SIL_nutshell_en.pdf FAQ: http://www.siliconescarbonbalance.com/pdf/SIL_faq_en.pdf Executive Summary: http://www.siliconescarbonbalance.com Video: http://www.siliconescarbonbalance.com

The impact of plastic packaging on life cycle energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in Europe

What is the amount of life cycle energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions (carbon footprint) of plastic packaging compared to other packaging materials?  Would the substitution of plastic packaging by other common packing materials result in more or less greenhouse gas emissions? Our study provides answers to these questions

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The impact of plastic packaging on life cycle energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in Europe

Denkstatt study on the effects of plastics on life cycle energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in Europe

On behalf of PlasticsEurope Denkstatt conducted the study: „The impact of plastics on life cycle energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in Europe". Two scientific institutes (EMPA - Switzerland and the University of Manchester, UK) critically reviewed the study and confirmed the sound scientific methodology and the quality of data. Part 1 of the study examines the total market of (substitutable) plastic products in Europe, which is represented by 32 case studies, and where plastics are compared to the mix of alternative materials available on the market with regards to energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions emissions in the total life cycle of products. It shows that if plastic products are to be substituted to the highest degree, the mass of alternative materials would be 3.7 times higher compared to plastics. Additionally the substitution of plastics increases life cycle energy consumption by 57% and greenhouse gas emission by 61%. Part 2 of the study investigates the influence of plastics in improving energy efficiency and climate protection (material efficiency, de-materialisation, insulation, supply of renewable energy, protection of food by packaging, relevance on the consumer carbon footprint, utilization of renewable resources, utility of alternative waste treatment options).

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The impact of plastics on life cycle energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in Europe

Energy consumption

The impact of plastic packaging on life cycle energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in Europe

What is the amount of life cycle energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions (carbon footprint) of plastic packaging compared to other packaging materials?  Would the substitution of plastic packaging by other common packing materials result in more or less greenhouse gas emissions? Our study provides answers to these questions
"pdf"-Symbol
The impact of plastic packaging on life cycle energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in Europe

Denkstatt study on the effects of plastics on life cycle energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in Europe

On behalf of PlasticsEurope Denkstatt conducted the study: „The impact of plastics on life cycle energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in Europe". Two scientific institutes (EMPA - Switzerland and the University of Manchester, UK) critically reviewed the study and confirmed the sound scientific methodology and the quality of data. Part 1 of the study examines the total market of (substitutable) plastic products in Europe, which is represented by 32 case studies, and where plastics are compared to the mix of alternative materials available on the market with regards to energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions emissions in the total life cycle of products. It shows that if plastic products are to be substituted to the highest degree, the mass of alternative materials would be 3.7 times higher compared to plastics. Additionally the substitution of plastics increases life cycle energy consumption by 57% and greenhouse gas emission by 61%. Part 2 of the study investigates the influence of plastics in improving energy efficiency and climate protection (material efficiency, de-materialisation, insulation, supply of renewable energy, protection of food by packaging, relevance on the consumer carbon footprint, utilization of renewable resources, utility of alternative waste treatment options).
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The impact of plastics on life cycle energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in Europe

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